The Ruckers Forum

Forum » Rugby » General Stuff » Louis Luyt - May he RIP
Login to reply
 
 
 
3591 Topic: Louis Luyt - May he RIP
clevermike

Status: Hall Of Fame
Posts: 11935
Louis Luyt - May he RIP
February 02, 2013, 06:05:31

It was with sadness that I have heard of the death of Dr Luyt.   Over the years I had met Dr Luyt many times - sometimes to deal with official municipal matters and sometimes to have tea and lunch with him.    During all those occassions he always was an absolute gentleman and I have found him to be reasonable and very much aware of his community responsibilities.

I have not seen Dr Luyt during the past six months - but saw his wife doing shopping a few times.   She invited me to come and see Dr Luyt - but I  somehow never managed to go.   He apparently was not really well and rarely left his home.  

Irrespective of what many may say - there can be no doubt about the fact that throughout his life he was interested in promotion of rugby and even in good and adverse times always did what he thought was in the interests of the game.  

My condolences to his family.


hakwa

Status: Senior player
Posts: 2308
RE: Louis Luyt - May he RIP
February 02, 2013, 10:43:30

Condolences to his family at this sad time!


BonganiP

Status: Baby Bok
Posts: 229
RE: Louis Luyt - May he RIP
February 02, 2013, 16:17:45

 Mike, this is not just about having a dig or just stirring again, but your opening post is pretty low class to say the least. you have been known to be able to sit and scribbling down one lenghty essay after the other about how crap Heyneke Meyer is, or how useless Morne Steyn is, or how the core of the problems with Springboks has something to do with the Bulls.

 

Now you come along and you use the death of a great rugby man to promote yourself. you describe at length how you well you knew the man and how his wife has asked you to visit them on many occasions, and then you colour it in with one little sentence about Louis Luyt. Surely if you were really that sincere, the piece would have been all about Louis Luyt, the man and his achievements, and a hell of a lot less about the fact that you knew him well.

 

 

Shame on you.  A man who did for SA Rugby what he did, and achieved in life what he did, surely did not deserve something like this.

 


sasuke uchiha

Status: Rugby Legend
Posts: 5822
RE: Louis Luyt - May he RIP
February 02, 2013, 17:29:44

 

 

Rugby icon Louis Luyt passes on


One of the most controversial figures in South African rugby, Dr Louis Luyt has died in a Durban Hospital aged 80.

Dr Luyt, who rose from a poor background to be a self-made millionaire, was a shrewd businessman, a rugby leader and one of the instigators of the professional revolution in Rugby Union. He was a bold and brash figure who never shied away from controversy along the way.

Born on June 18 1932, in Britstown in the Cape, he worked his way up in the fertiliser business to head his own company Triomf Fertiliser. As a rugby player Luyt played for the Blue Bulls and went on to represent, and captain, the Orange Free State from the 1950s.

While making his name as a businessman, Luyt was first thrown into controversy when he was involved in fronting the establishment of the newspaper, the Citizen, which it later became apparent was funded by the government in the Info scandal. Luyt denied knowledge of this and reinvented his business again, this time with a brewing venture called Luyt Lager.

He was elected as the president of the Transvaal Rugby Union in 1989 and shortly after rose to the position of president of the South African Rugby Union.

It was in this time that Luyt also played an integral part in the re-entry into international sport, being part of a group which met with the then-outlawed African National Congress on rugby unity.

But no sooner had the Springboks been allowed back, than Luyt courted controversy by defying an agreement and playing Die Stem as the country’s anthem before the 1992 test against the All Blacks at Ellis Park.

KEY NEGOTIATOR

He went on to be a key negotiator in the uniting of the three rugby boards and was the driving force behind a successful 1995 Rugby World Cup tournament, won by the Springboks.

Luyt also managed to stem a breakaway movement to professional rugby, and led the move for the Southern Hemisphere nations to join as Sanzar, bringing about the Super Rugby and Tri-Nations tournaments.

As government and rugby officials continually clashed, Luyt contested the government’s right to install a commission of enquiry into the sport, eventually taking the bold and bizarre step of dragging the government to court.

It remains the only instance in South African history where a sports official has successfully forced a sitting State President – Nelson Mandela – to take the stand as a hostile witness.

While Luyt won the case, it soured relations at all levels and led to rugby bosses passing a motion of no confidence in his leadership, which led to his resignation.

“Doc Luyt was a single-minded and determined individual who dominated rugby politics following the death of Doc Craven,” said Oregan Hoskins, the president of Saru. “On behalf of Saru I would like to send rugby’s condolences to his family and friends.”

GLRU president Kevin de Klerk expressed his sadness at the news of Luyt’s passing and conveyed his condolences to Luyt’s family.

“I would like to convey my deepest sympathies to Doc Luyt’s dear wife and children on behalf of myself and the Golden Lions Rugby Union,” he said.

“This Union was always regarded as his home in rugby and we are saddened by the news of his passing.”

De Klerk refered to Luyt as a close and personal friend, who he had the utmost respect for.

“He was always a great mentor, for most of us involved in the game, and we always strove to attain the very high standards in the sport that he set. I will sorely miss him.”

After moving out of rugby, Luyt was still active as a member of the Blue Bulls ex-players organisation and made several appearances at rugby meetings in Pretoria.

He also founded the Federal Alliance and contested the 1999 election, winning a seat in parliament and served as an MP for two years. In that time he sat on the judicial services committee.

He was married to Adri, and the couple has four children.


sasuke uchiha

Status: Rugby Legend
Posts: 5822
RE: Louis Luyt - May he RIP
February 02, 2013, 17:29:45

@bongani2,


hopefully this article will go along way to chilling u out, but for the record, how was mikes post self promoting???
revealing that one knows an individual should be taken at face value, especially considering all the nice things that mike said about the rugby head.
i can think of other things to be more shameful of and i hardly think this is the appropriate thread to be so anal, but each to their own.


BonganiP

Status: Baby Bok
Posts: 229
RE: Louis Luyt - May he RIP
February 02, 2013, 17:52:59

 Thanks for posting the article Sas and apologies if I came accross as being anal. I just have a thing about people who always try to be "a somebody" just because he/she has met or know someone who really is a somebody.The core of Mike's post is portraying the fact that he knew Louis and how he experienced Luyt and how Luyt's wife often asked him to come visit them and how he did not get around to it.

 

Even though it is clear that it is not your own creation, the piece that you posted is about the man in question, and nobody else.


clevermike

Status: Hall Of Fame
Posts: 11935
RE: Louis Luyt - May he RIP
February 02, 2013, 19:10:19

Bongani

Sorry if what I said is taken as self-promotion of my own image.   There is a lot of people that bad-mouthed Louis Luyt and my only intention was to paint a real picture of him.   I merely wanted to indicate from personal experiene what the man was like in reality.

The main objective was to indicate how I saw him - knowing him since 1986 - and how I found his approach to people.   There is one thing that is evident - he did not suffer fools gladly and issues had to be dealt with on a professional and factional basis.

I hope the air has now been cleared.   He was always  friendly  to me and I feel very bad about his death - so lets please leave it at that.     


sebastienchabal

Status: Bok regular
Posts: 759
RE: Louis Luyt - May he RIP
February 03, 2013, 12:24:26

Bongani your comments about Clevermike show you have a chip on your shoulder...if Mike is relating the truth as he found it there's is absolutely nothing wrong with it. If it's true (and there is no reason to disbelieve it) why do lesser men think it's names dropping. In the course of life I met a few famous people from all walks of life and I certainly do take any accolade for it...it just sometimes happens, even to the lowly in life such as me.

Glad Mike could experience the nicer side of LL but there is always those that have negative images of him. None of us is perfect.

Strange though, a friend of mine, who piloted the Springbok side over to Australia a long time ago found him rude. It was the tradition of the pilot to be introduced to the team before flight and all the players got out of their seats and shook Kevin's hand warmly, except LL who arrogantly sat in his seat and looked scornfully at Kevin's...it's just manners and breeding that was missing?? 

Neverless LL did a lot for SA rugby and must be remembered for that. Yes RIP LL.


BonganiP

Status: Baby Bok
Posts: 229
RE: Louis Luyt - May he RIP
February 03, 2013, 15:29:06

 Listen Sebastian, I appreciate your urge to jump up in defence of ou Maaikie, but I am sure he is quite capable of defending himself. Fact is that ou Maaikie has this nick of name dropping and a need to be important. If he is not busy delivering papers at the UN, he is busy rubbing shoulders with Jacob Zuma and now he had to explain how intimately he knew Louis Luyt. Of course all under the disguise of setting the record straight. Does he really think that anybody gives a crap about what Luyt's personality was like? We all just appreciate his dedication to rugby and what he has done for rugby on the whole. Exactly in the same way that he tackled everything in life. He never took no prisoners and it was of no importance for him to be a nice guy.I believe that he also believed in the motto: "Nice guys come second". TBH, I also believe that he was probably a bit of a dickhead, but then again, that was probably key to what he has achieved in life.So in short, I don't give a flying fuck what you think about my view of ou Maaikie's post, just as I don't give a toss whether or not ou Maaikie used to sleep on the carpet in Luyt's bedroom, next to his slippers. 


mozart

Status: Hall Of Fame
Posts: 7837
RE: Louis Luyt - May he RIP
February 03, 2013, 16:05:12

It's human custom to treat any death with solemnity. Mike was merely establishing his relationship with the individual, making it personal. I see nothing in that that would justify a bunch of undignified yapping, inappropriate to the occasion.


BonganiP

Status: Baby Bok
Posts: 229
RE: Louis Luyt - May he RIP
February 03, 2013, 17:43:01

 No surprise in the old pickled goat testicel also jumping in to have his say. You are exactly right.

 

The death of someone like Louis Luyt should get the respect it deserves and not be used for a platform to boost your own image. But then again.......someone who is forever rubbing his material wealth and his games of golf at St. Andrews and his dinners at Gordon Ramsays and his jetting to Aus and, and. and, ........ would of course not see anything out of place here. 


clevermike

Status: Hall Of Fame
Posts: 11935
RE: Louis Luyt - May he RIP
February 03, 2013, 19:39:28

bongani

Don't be a bloody fool - name dropping is not an issue.   Because I am feeling bad that a person I knew well and met many times died and I post a thread on it here - is suddenly an affront to you.   That is bad and make me feel terrible.   Grow up and learn something about life - if I ever want to name drop I will write a book and it would include people that would surprise you.

Incidentally where did I commit the mortal si of name droppng?  Some examples please.    


Super Pat

Status: Ref
Posts: 16
RE: Louis Luyt - May he RIP
February 03, 2013, 20:08:10

Ballito is not a big place. There is a pretty good chance that anyone living there who's involved in any way with community matters will have had some dealings with the Luyt family.


Chippo

Status: Squad member
Posts: 514
RE: Louis Luyt - May he RIP
February 03, 2013, 22:24:43

May the late Luyt's soul RIP.

He was a great servant to rugby up in the Vaal for many years. he achieved what no one else has managed to achieve since.

... a GLRU or TRU with a positive bank balance and happiness within.

He will also go down as a tyrant, a fearless businessman and the oke that took Madiba to court.

 


Beeno1

Status: Hall Of Fame
Posts: 11035
RE: Louis Luyt - May he RIP
February 04, 2013, 11:38:32

Fine post Mike and happy to have some first hand account of the man as the press is often unreliable.

One has to respect his achievements in building a business empire and also making Transvaal the best provincial side in the world and also the wealthiest I heard. Since his departure the Lions have collapsed although there have been new signs of life more recently.

RIP  Dr Luyt.


Beeno1

Status: Hall Of Fame
Posts: 11035
RE: Louis Luyt - May he RIP
February 04, 2013, 14:22:53

Found this summary of his life ex Sport 24

One of the most controversial figures in South African rugby, Dr Louis Luyt has died in a Durban Hospital aged 80.

Dr Luyt, who rose from a poor background to be a self-made millionaire, was a shrewd businessman, a rugby leader and one of the instigators of the professional revolution in Rugby Union. He was a bold and brash figure who never shied away from controversy along the way.

Born on June 18 1932, in Britstown in the Cape, he worked his way up in the fertiliser business to head his own company Triomf Fertiliser. As a rugby player Luyt played for the Blue Bulls and went on to represent, and captain, the Orange Free State from the 1950s.

While making his name as a businessman, Luyt was first thrown into controversy when he was involved in fronting the establishment of the newspaper, the Citizen, which it later became apparent was funded by the government in the Info scandal. Luyt denied knowledge of this and reinvented his business again, this time with a brewing venture called Luyt Lager.

He was elected as the president of the Transvaal Rugby Union in 1989 and shortly after rose to the position of president of the South African Rugby Union.

It was in this time that Luyt also played an integral part in the re-entry into international sport, being part of a group which met with the then-outlawed African National Congress on rugby unity.

But no sooner had the Springboks been allowed back, than Luyt courted controversy by defying an agreement and playing Die Stem as the country’s anthem before the 1992 test against the All Blacks at Ellis Park.

KEY NEGOTIATOR

He went on to be a key negotiator in the uniting of the three rugby boards and was the driving force behind a successful 1995 Rugby World Cup tournament, won by the Springboks.

Luyt also managed to stem a breakaway movement to professional rugby, and led the move for the Southern Hemisphere nations to join as Sanzar, bringing about the Super Rugby and Tri-Nations tournaments.

As government and rugby officials continually clashed, Luyt contested the government’s right to install a commission of enquiry into the sport, eventually taking the bold and bizarre step of dragging the government to court.

It remains the only instance in South African history where a sports official has successfully forced a sitting State President – Nelson Mandela – to take the stand as a hostile witness.

While Luyt won the case, it soured relations at all levels and led to rugby bosses passing a motion of no confidence in his leadership, which led to his resignation.

“Doc Luyt was a single-minded and determined individual who dominated rugby politics following the death of Doc Craven,” said Oregan Hoskins, the president of Saru. “On behalf of Saru I would like to send rugby’s condolences to his family and friends.”

GLRU president Kevin de Klerk expressed his sadness at the news of Luyt’s passing and conveyed his condolences to Luyt’s family.

“I would like to convey my deepest sympathies to Doc Luyt’s dear wife and children on behalf of myself and the Golden Lions Rugby Union,” he said.

“This Union was always regarded as his home in rugby and we are saddened by the news of his passing.”

De Klerk refered to Luyt as a close and personal friend, who he had the utmost respect for.

“He was always a great mentor, for most of us involved in the game, and we always strove to attain the very high standards in the sport that he set. I will sorely miss him.”

After moving out of rugby, Luyt was still active as a member of the Blue Bulls ex-players organisation and made several appearances at rugby meetings in Pretoria.

He also founded the Federal Alliance and contested the 1999 election, winning a seat in parliament and served as an MP for two years. In that time he sat on the judicial services committee.

He was married to Adri, and the couple has four children.

 

He also knew Mike in person!


sasuke uchiha

Status: Rugby Legend
Posts: 5822
RE: Louis Luyt - May he RIP
February 04, 2013, 16:18:23

@ben10,

 

o_O,,,,errrrrr ok, BTW check out the comment posted at February 02, 2013, 17:29:44, :o)


clevermike

Status: Hall Of Fame
Posts: 11935
RE: Louis Luyt - May he RIP
February 04, 2013, 19:29:27

Sasue

Luyt's real father commited polygamy when he "married": his mother and decamped and disappeared whn he was found out.  The marriage was actually null and void and his mother thereafter married a labourer by the name of Luyt - who worked on a farm in the Karoo.   They consequwntly changed Louis' surname to Luyt.

They lived in a wood and iron shack - the poorest of the poor.    He told a story about his grandmother - how they were working on the farm and at lunchtime they saw his grandmother walking towards them - bringing them some refreshments and cool drinks.   She in fact walked twelve miles to do that.   In his book he mentioned that after he became an extremely wealthy man he bought a nice house for his parents and paid his father and mother a very good monthly allowance.   His father could not adjust to that environment and died shortly after the arrnangment was made - being a labourer his life long he just could not adjust to an environment where labour work was not a daily task.  

He was a self-made millionaire and his initial house in Ballito was a palace.   Being on the main beach in Ballito - part of the beach was actually on his property - - he later on built a lifeguard tower on the property.  He then had the house demolished and had 84 flats built on the site.    I always used to joke with him about the demolition of the house and said that is one thing I cannot forgive him for doing.

When a person had coffee or tea with him on the pool deck - he used his cell phone to phone the kitchen to bring refreshments.  

He used to bring the whole Lions rugby squad to the house for weekends using his personal Lear Jet.   There were 11 en-suite bedrooms alone.  

However, he told me once that the house was a problem later on in life after his children left   He told me that he went away for a week on business and when he got hoime his wife was in tears begging him not to ever leave her alone in the house again.   He thought that she was just being difficult - but then his wife went away for a week.  When she got back - he said to her "Please never leave me alone in this place again".   That I believe was the final straw why the house was ultimately demolished.  

A very intersting person - but if you deal with trifles with him - he would be very harsh and that is why certain people were terrified of him.   However, I found him to be a very nice person and we got along very well.

 


Leave a reply:

You need to be logged in to leave a reply.
 
 

From The Sideline